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Australia (8) Austria (1) Belgium (2) Britain (288) Canada (13) Czechoslavakia (2) France (23)
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Poland (4) Russia (1) South Africa (1) Switzerland (1) United States (35) Yugoslavia (2)
Name Description #books
Commercial - Aeronautical
Cripps, S. T. B. A pilot who joined the Royal Flying Corps in 1917, flying photographic reconnaissance and bombing flights, remaining with the RAF until 1929. He later flew with Canadian Colonial Airways, Canadian Airways and then Imperial Airways.1
Scott, S. W. A. A pilot and navigator of Gravesend Aviation, Provincial Airways and then BOAC who flew with the Atlantic Ferry organisation during WW2 and later also flew the Trans-African war routes.1
White, Ernest Robert Bristow A pilot of Imperial Airways and then BOAC, where he acted as navigator on their first Trans-Atlantic flight. In 1937 he piloted pressmen from Alexandria to Penang, one of the longest charter flights on record. He was seconded to Atfero in spring 1941 but was killed when Liberator AM261 crashed on the Isle of Arran after take-off on the 10 Aug 1941.1
Wilcockson, Arthur Sidney A British Overseas Airways Corporation pilot who was among the pilots who established the Atlantic Ferry organisation for pilots transporting aircraft through Newfoundland and Europe in WW2. A significant early aviator of many records and awards.1
Woods-Humphrey, George A airline pioneer who became General Manager of Imperial Airways when it was created in 1924, later becoming managing director. He was originally a marine engineer and naval architect working on destroyer, cruiser and submarine design before spending four years in the Royal Flying Corps/RAF prior to entering civil aviation.1
Youell, Alan Bruce Hamilton 'Jimmy' A pilot who was one of the original 16 pilots of Imperial Airways in 1924, later with BOAC and the Atlantic Ferry organisation and flew the first commercial helicopter in Switzerland in 1947.1
Media
Anderson, Godfrey H.P. A British correspondent who worked for the Associated Press for 38 years. He served as a war correspondent in Ethiopia, Egypt, Palestine, Syria and France and chief of bureau in Belgium. He was taken prisoner in 1941 by Rommel’s forces in Libya and held prisoner in German camps in Libya, Italy and Germany.1
Ashwood, Terry A British Pathe News Cameraman and later director who covered the North African campaigns in WW2 and received an O.B.E.1
Balchin, Nigel An Engish novelist and screenwriter known for his novels written immediately after World War 2.1
Bayliss, Fred W. A British Paramount News cameraman who covered the Spanish Civil War and was the first cameraman assigned to France in WW2. He was later assigned to the Eighth Army and died in a plane crash in Italy on July 9th 1943.1
Beith, John Hay A novelist, playwright, essayist and historian who wrote under the pen name Ian Hay3
Bird, Cyril Kenneth A British Cartoonist known for his editorship of Punch magazine with a pen name of Fougasse. During World War II, he worked unpaid for the Ministry of Information.1
Capell, Richard A British journalist who was music critic for the Daily Mail and Daily Telegraph. During WW2 he served as a war correspondent in France, the western Sahara and Greece for the Daily Telegraph.1
Clifford, Alexander G. A British journalist and author, best known as a Daily Mail war correspondent during WW2 who was a friend of Daily Express correspondent Alan Moorehead. They spent much of the war in each other’s company during the Desert War, the Allied invasion of Italy and the Invasion of Normandy.1
Garnett, David A British writer and publisher who was born in Brighton and a prominent member of the Bloomsbury Group. He also jointly founded the 'Nonesuch Press'.1
Handley, Thomas Reginald 'Tommy' A British comedian, mainly known for the BBC radio programme , 'Its That Man Again (ITMA)'.1
Jacob, Harold Alaric An English writer and journalist who was Reuters correspondent in Washington in the 1930s, and a war correspondent during WW2 in North Africa, Burma and Moscow. In May 1941 he set out as a war correspondent for the Daily Express. He sailed to Cairo and the next two years he spent with the 8th Army in North Africa, initially covering the Siege of Tobruk and Operation Crusader.1
Keating, Geoffrey A British official photographer of the War Office who was part of the 1st Unit of the Army Film and Photographic Unit (AFPU) in North Africa, a corps of trained photographers and cameramen with the army created in Oct 1941.1
Lewis, Cecil Day, CBE A poet and poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1968 to 1972.1
Linklater, Eric Robert Russell A writer of novels and short stories, military history and travel books.2
Masefield, John Edward An English poet and writer, and Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1930 until his death in 1967. He documented the last nine days of the Belgium campaign in his book 'The Nine Days Wonder'.1
Moorehead, Alan McCrae A Daily Express war correspondent and author of popular histories, most notably two books on the nineteenth-century exploration of the Nile, The White Nile (1960) and The Blue Nile (1962). Australian-born, he lived in England, and Italy, from 1937.1
Pritchett, Sir Victor Sawdon A British writer and critic known for his short stories who worked for the BBC and the Ministry of Information during WW2.1
Ronnie Noble A British cameraman who became the youngest British war correspondent with the BEF in France. After the fall of France he went to the Middle East as part of the Western Desert Press Corps. He was taken prisoner by the Italians at Tobruk. His reporting helped to establish a model for camera-work in television current affairs programmes; he was also one of the founding members of BBC television’s sports department.1
Salusbury, Frederic Hamilton Piozzi A British journalist and diplomat who became the chief editor of the Daily Herald after working for the newspaper for approximately two years. He served in the Mediterranean during the Second World War and subsequently received his first posting as the acting British Ambassador to Greece.1
Sargent, Thomas Henry (Max Miller) An English comedian who was widely regarded as the greatest stand-up comedian of his generation. He was known for his risqué jokes, his wicked charm, and his flamboyant suits.1
Selkirk, Alexander A Scottish sailor who spent more than four years as a castaway in the South Pacific Ocean. A possible inspiration for Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe.1
Vanderson, William A British Official photographer of Fox Photos, who was at the German prisoner of war camps for officers (Oflag) along with other British officers.1
Ward, Edward Henry Harold An Anglo-Irish journalist, war correspondent, and author. In 1937 he was taken on by the BBC as a radio announcer, and in 1939 sent as a BBC war correspondent to Finland. He reported from Athens on the May 1941 evacuation of the city and in November 1941 was taken prisoner by Italian forces at Tobruk following the Battle of Sidi Rezegh.1
Military - Air Force
Alcock, John William 'Jack' A Royal Navy and later RAF officer who, with navigator Arthur Whitten Brown, piloted the first non-stop transatlantic flight from St. John's, Newfoundland to Clifden, Connemara, Ireland. He died in a flying accident in France in 1919.1
Baldwin, John Eustice Arthur A Royal Air Force officer who was recalled to serve in WW2 as Air Office Commanding No. 3 Group at RAF Bomber Command. In 1942, he was acting Commander in Chief of Bomber Command when the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau escaped from Brest. Later he was Deputy Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, India and also Air Officer Commanding Third Tactical Air Force during the battle for South East Asia.1
Barratt, Sir Arthur Sheridan An Air Chief Marshal in the Royal Air Force during WW2. He served as Principal RAF Liaison Officer to the French Air Force and then Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief British Air Forces in France.1
Blount, Charles Hubert Boulby A British Air Vice-Marshall who was the Air Officer Commanding (AOC) the Royal Air Force Component of the B.E.F. which provided reconnaissance and fighter cover.1
Bowhill, Sir Frederick William A British senior commander of the Royal Air Force. During WW2 he was the Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief at RAF Coastal Command and also at other times commanded RAF Ferry Command and RAF Transport Command.3
Brown, Arthur Whitten The navigator of the first successful non-stop transatlantic flight from St. John's, Newfoundland to Clifden, Connemara, Ireland. During WW2 he rejoined the RAF and worked in RAF Training Command as a pilot officer dealing with navigation.1
Bulloch, Terence Malcolm An R.A.F. pilot in Coastal Command who made the greatest number of sightings and attacks against German U-boats during the Battle of the Atlantic. By the end of the war he had been credited with sinking four, twice the number by any other pilot. He later joined B.O.A.C. and British Airways.1
Douglas, William Sholto, 1st Baron Douglas of Kirtleside A senior R.A.F. officer, who was the Assistant Chief of the Air Staff at the Air Ministry and then became Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief of Fighter Command in which he was responsible for rebuilding the command’s strength after the attrition of the Battle of Britain.1
Dowding, Air Chief Marshal Hugh Caswell Tremenheere, 1st Baron Dowding A British officer in the R.A.F. who was the Air Officer Commanding the RAF Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain in 1940.1
Ferté, Sir Philip Bennet Joubert de la A senior commander in the R.A.F. during the 1930s and WW2. At the start of WW2, he was Air Officer Commanding Air Forces in India and on his return to Great Britain he eventually returned to his former job as Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief Coastal Command. He introduced a torpedo version of the Beaufighter.1
Hallowes, Herbert James Lempriere A Royal Air Force officer who served before and during WW2 initially with 43 Squadron. He was posted to 122 Squadron in 1942 and was later in 222 and 165 Squadrons and at the end of WW2 he commanded 504 Squadron. After WW2 he served in the Secreterial Branch with the rank of wing commander.1
Harris, Arthur Travers A Royal Air Force officer who took command of No. 5 Group RAF in England at the outbreak of WW2. In Feb 1942 he was appointed Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief RAF Bomber Command and retained that position for the rest of the war. He had been in the RAF since its creation in 1918.1
Harvey, Leslie Gordon TBD.0
Kilkenny, John Callistus TBD.0
Nettleton, John Dering A Royal Air Force officer who was awarded the Victoria Cross in WW2 for his role for leading a raid on a U-boat engine plant in Augsburg on 17 April 1942. Commissioned in Dec 1938, he then served with Nos. 207, 98 and 185 Squadrons before joining No. 44 Squadron. He lost his life when flying back from a later raid against Turin in northern Italy.1
Newnham, Maurice Ashdown TBD.0
Penman, David Jackson A Royal Air Force officer who as pilot was awarded a DSO for a daring low-level daylight raid on Augsburg in 1942. Having joined No 44 Bomber squadron on 1938, he also served with No 97 during WW2 and in 1944 flew Dakotas dropping supplies to the 14th Army as it advanced towards Rangoon. After WW2 he co-ordinated the RAF's air transport operations flown from Luneburg during the Berlin Air Lift.1
Pirie, George Clark A senior commander in the RAF during WW2 and the immediate post-war years. He served as Air Officer Commanding the RAF in Northern Ireland, Air Officer Administration at Headquarters Middle East Command, Director-General of Organisation at the Air Ministry and Deputy Air Commander in Chief at Air Command South East Asia in 1945.1
Portal, Charles Frederick Algernon, 1st Viscount Portal of Hungerford A senior R.A.F. officer who in the early stages of WW2 was commander-in-chief of Bomber Command and for the rest of the war was Chief of the Air Staff. In retirement he was the chairman of the British Aircraft Corporation.1
Salmond, Sir John Maitland A British Air Marshal of the R.A.F. During the WW2, he was Director of Armament Production at the Ministry of Aircraft Production and also Director-General of Flying Control and Air Sea Rescue.1
Seys, Richard G. An RAF pilot who was the captain of the first fully loaded glider to be towed across the Atlantic, from Montreal to England in 28hrs. The glider named 'Voo-Doo' was designed by the 'Waco Aircraft Company'.1
Sherwood, John Seymour A Royal Air Force officer who was awarded a DSO during a daring low-level daylight raid on Augsburg in 1942. He led the second formation of Lancasters on the raid with 97 Squadron and also served with 144 squadron.1
Slessor, Sir John Cotesworth A senior R.A.F. officer, who held several commands in WW2 including Air Officer Commanding Coastal Command in 1943 and 1944. He is credited with helping to turn the tide of the Battle of the Atlantic through his use of long-range bombers against German U-boats. He also served as Chief of the Air Staff from 1950 to 1952.1
St Valery Norman, Henry Nigel TBD.0
Strange, Louis Arbon TBD.0
Thompson, James Herbert An R.A.F. officer who as Squadron Leader of No. 269 Squadron was the only aircraft captain in WW2 to have a U-boat surrender to him. U-570 was attacked by him and his navigator from their Hudson aircraft with depth charges and machine guns.1
Military - Army
Adam, Sir Ronald Forbes, 2nd Baronet A British general who commanded III Corp in the B.E.F. and was the Adjutant General from 1941, a key role with responsibility for all personnel, administration and organisational matters.1
Alexander, Harold Rupert Leofric George, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis A British Marshall who served with distinction in both World Wars. During the Battle of Flanders he led an infantry Division and successfully withdrew to Dunkirk where as Corp I commander ensured the successful evacuation of all troops.2
Auchinleck, Claude John Eyre A British Army commander who was Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Army in July 1941 when he was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Middle East theatre. Events during the 1942 Alamein campaign resulted in his removal and later reinstatement as a successful Commander-in-Chief of India until the Partition in 1947.2
Bagnold, Ralph Alger The founder and first commander of the British Army’s Long Range Desert Group during WW2 and generally considered to have been a pioneer of desert exploration for his activities during the 1930s including the first recorded east-west crossing of the Libyan Desert.1
Barker, Michael George Henry A British General who commanded I Corp of the B.E.F. in 1940 before being replaced by General Alexander.1
Bradish, W. P. B. TBD.0
Brooke, John Warden A Northern Irish politician who was the son of Basil Brooke, 1st Viscount Brookeborough. During WW2 he served in the British Army in North Africa, Italy and Germany. He was on the personal staff of Field Marshal Sir Harold Alexander and also an Aide-de-Camp to Field Marshal Lord Wavell.1
Buchanan-Smith, Alick Drummond A British soldier and politician who served in WW1, 1916–18 with Gordon Highlanders and in WW2, 1939–45 with the 5th and 9th Battalions, Gordon Highlanders, and as Director, Selection of Personnel, War Office.1
Clayton, Patrick Andrew A British surveyor and soldier who spent nearly 20 years with the Egyptian Survey department during the 1920s and 1930s extensively mapping large areas of desert. He served in the British Army’s Long Range Desert Group during World War II where he lead 'T' Patrol.1
Creagh, Michael O’Moore A British soldier who served in both WW1 and WW2. He commanded the 7th Armoured Division, the Desert Rats, between 1939 and 1941. He led the division through its earliest triumphs against the Italians in North Africa.1
Cunningham, Sir Alan Gordon A senior officer of the British Army noted for his victories over Italian forces in the East African Campaign during WW2. He commanded the newly formed Eighth Army in North Africa in August 1941 but was later relieved of his command during the Libyan Desert offensive after early losses led him to recommend the offensive be curtailed.2
Dill, Sir John Greer A British Field Marshal who was Chief of the Imperial General Staff (C.I.G.S.) from the end of the Battle of Flanders. He was later a senior British representative of the Combined Chiefs of Staff during WW2.2
Fonblanque, Philip de A British general who was in charge of the logistics for the B.E.F in France and Belgium.1
Fortune, Sir Victor Morven A British General who commanded the 51st Highland division, a division that remained in France and fought with the French X Corps. He spent the rest of the war as a prisoner of war.2
Franklyn, Sir Harold Edmund A British General who was the Commander of the 5th Div from 1938. He led this division in the Battle of Arras, one of many actions that contributed to creating the necessary defensive lines for the eventual Dunkirk evacuation.1
Freyberg, Bernard Cyril, 1st Baron Freyberg A British-born General and the seventh Governor-General of New Zealand from 1946 to 1952. He commanded the New Zealand Force in the Battles of Greece and Crete and in the North African and Italian Campaigns.2
Holmes, Sir William George A British General who commanded the 42nd Division during the Battle of Flanders.1
Hoskyns, Lieutenant-Colonel Chandos A Soldier who was the commander of the 1st Rifle Brigade in the defence of Calais during 23-26th May 1940.1
Ironside, William Edmund, 1st Baron Ironside GCB, CMG, DSO A British military commander who served as the Chief of the Imperial Staff during the 1st year of World War 2.2
Jellicoe, George Patrick John Rushworth, 2nd Earl Jellicoe A British politician, statesman and diplomat who was one of the longest-serving parliamentarians in the world. During WW2 he was an Army officer who served initially in the Coldstream Guards before joining No. 8 Commando and sailing in 1941 to the Middle East with Layforce and later was Commander of the Special Boat Regiment Middle East.1
Johnson, Dudley Graham A British General who was the Commander of the 4th Div during the Battle of Flanders. He received the Victoria Cross for an action at Sambre Canal during the first world war.1
Keller, Lieutenant-Colonel A Soldier who was the commander of the 3rd Royal Tank Regiment in the defence of Calais during 23-26th May 1940.1
Lander, John TBD.0
Lindsay, Martin Alexander TBD.0
Loyd, Sir Henry Charles A British General who was the Commander of the 2nd Division of the 1st Corps in the B.E.F. during the Battle of Flanders.1
Martel, Sir Giffard Le Quesne A British General who was a pioneering military engineer and tank strategist. He commanded the 50th Division with a tank attack on Rommell’s 7th Panzer Division in the Battle of Arras driving them back eight miles, so buying time for the BEF’s evacuation from Dunkirk.1
Mason-MacFarlane, Sir Frank Noel A British General who was Director of Military Intelligence with the B.E.F. in 1939-1940 and was also the commander of 'Mac Force', an improvised formation during the retreat to Dunkirk.1
McCartney, Lieutenant-Colonel A Soldier who was the commander of the 1st Queen Victoria’s Rifles in the defence of Calais during 23-26th May 1940.1
Miller, Sir Euan Alfred Bews, KBE CB DSO MC A Soldier who was the commander of the 2nd King’s Royal Rifle Corps (60th Rifles) in the defence of Calais during 23-26th May 1940.1
Mitford, Edward Cecil Osbaldeston A British officer in the British Army during WW2 and after. He was an explorer of the Sahara desert before the war which was instrumental in his becoming one of the original members of the Long Range Desert Group.1
Montgomery, bernard, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein A British army officer who was in command of all Allied ground forces during Operation Overlord and then the 21st Army Group during the rest of the North West Europe campaign.3
Nicholson, Brigadier Claude A Soldier who was the commander of the 30th Infantry Brigade in the defence of Calais during 23-26th May 1940.1
O’Connor, Richard Nugent A British general who commanded the Western Desert Force in the early years of WW2. He was the field commander for Operation Compass, in which his forces completely destroyed a much larger Italian army in Egypt and Libya.1
Osborne, Edmund Archibald A British General who served in WW2 as General Officer Commanding of the 44th Division and then the Commander of II Corps from 1940.1
Pownall, Sir Henry Royds A British General who was Chief of the General Staff to the B.E.F. until the fall of France in May 1940.1
Rennie, Thomas Gordon A British officer who was taken prisoner at Saint-Valery-en-Caux in 1940, but then escaped nine days later. He was made Commander of 5th Battalion Black Watch in 1942, 154th Brigade in 1943, 3rd Infantry Division in 1944 and then finally the 51st (Highland) Division but was killed by mortar fire in March 1945.1
Ritchie, Sir Neil Methuen A senior British army officer during WW2 who was given command of the Eighth Army, in November 1941, following the dismissal of Lt-Gen. Alan Cunningham. At the Battle of Gazala in May–June 1942 the British were heavily defeated, losing the port of Tobruk and he was sacked on 25 June 1942 prior to the first battle of El Alamein.2
Rock, John Frank TBD.0
Shaw, William Boyd Kennedy A British desert explorer, botanist, archaeologist and founding member of the Long Range Desert Group during WW2.1
Stanley-Clarke, Arthur Christopher Lancelot A British officer who was the commander of the 154th Infantry Brigade of the 51st (Highland) Infantry Division) during the Battle of France in 1940.1
Steele, Donald Gavin A New Zealand soldier who was a member of the Long Range Desert Group during WW2, commanding the R Patrol.1
Swayne, Sir John George des Reaux A British General who was the head of the British Military Mission to the French General Headquarters in 1940.1
Thorne, Sir Augustus Francis Andrew Nicol A British General who was the Commander of the 48th Div which played a significant role in the defence of the Dunkirk perimeter in May 1940.1
Vereker, John Standish Surtees Prendergast, 6th Viscount Gort A British Field Marshal who was decorated with the Victoria Cross and is most famous for commanding the B.E.F. in 1940 that was ultimately evacuated from Dunkirk.2
Wavell, Archibald Percival, 1st Earl Wavell A British General and Field Marshal who was Commander-In-Chief Middle East during the 1940 victory over the Italians in North Africa and the subsequent defeat by the Germans in April 1941 after being ordered to weaken his force by sending part of it to defend Greece. He was Commander-In-Chief India from Jul 1941 until Jun 1943.4
Wilson, Henry Maitland, 1st Baron Wilson A British General and Field Marshal who held many commands including General Officer Commanding-in-Chief of Egypt, GOC in Palestine/Trans-Jordan, GOC Ninth Army, GOC Middle-East, and Supreme Allied Commander in the Mediterranean from Jan 1944.2
Military - Navy
Agnew, William Gladstone A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially as the Commanding Officer of the Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS Corfu. He commanded the 1941 Force K in the Mediterranean from his ship the Cruiser HMS Aurora , the 12th Cruiser Squadron and later the Gunnery School HMS Excellent at Portsmouth.1
Alexander, Albert Victor, 1st Earl of Hillsborough A British Labour politician who was three times the First Lord of the Admiralty including during most of WW2.2
Alexander, Arthur Hoyer A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially on the Cruiser HMS Norfolk and then roles based at many different shore establishments including HMS Drake in Devonport, HMS Nile in Alexandria, HMS St. Angelo in Malta, HMS Hannibal in Taranto and HMS Royal Anne in Arromanches.1
Arliss, Stephen Harry Tolson A Royal Navy officer who started WW2 as the Naval Attaché to South America from the shore station HMS President. He commanded the Destroyer HMS Napier, was Commodore of the Eastern Fleet Destroyer Flotilla and later Commanding Officer of the Heavy Cruiser HMS Berwick.1
Ashton, Francis Halley A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially on the HMS Beauly and Cruiser HMS Phoebe followed by roles based at the shore establishments of HMS Stag in Port Said and HMS Saunders in Kabret.1
Atkins, Herbert Farquhar A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 on the Cruisers HMS Emerald and HMS Orion followed by roles based at the shore establishments of HMS Victory in Portsmouth and HMS President.1
Back, Geoffrey Robert Bensly A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commanding Officer of Destroyer HMS Duncan, the leader of the 21st Destroyer Flotilla and later the Commanding Officer of the Cruiser HMS Orion. He was killed when the Orion was bombed and badly damaged during the evacuation of Crete on 29 May 1941.1
Baillie-Grohman, Harold Tom A Royal Navy officer who served during early WW2 as the commanding Officer of the Battleship HMS Ramillies. Was honoured for his organisation of the withdrawal of the British Army from Greece in 1941 and also accepted the surrender of Kiel in 1946.1
Banks, William Eric A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarine HMS Clyde, the submarine depot ship HMS Bonaventure and the destroyers HMS Léopard, Leamington, Douglas and Firedrake during WW2. he was later the Commander of the anti-submarine establishment HMS Osprey.1
Barlow, Thomas Erasmus A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS L23, United, Unison and Supreme during WW2. Later he was commander of Her Majesty's Naval Base Devonport, Deputy Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire and a trustee of the Galapagos Conservation Trust.1
Barry, Claud Barrington A Royal Navy officer who was active in submarine warfare during WW1 and the inter-war years. He served in WW2 as the Commander of the Battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth and later the Rear-Admiral, Submarines at HMS Dolphin, the submarine depot at Gosport.2
Bateson, Stuart Latham A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially on the Battlecruiser HMS Repulse and later was the Commanding Officer of the Minelayer HMS Latona, the Cruiser HMS Ajax and the Cruiser HMS London.1
Bennington, Leslie William Abel A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H28, Porpoise and Tally-Ho during WW2. He later commanded the light cruiser HMS Aurora, the Royal Navy Air Station HMS Gamecock and was the Captain of Dockyard and Queen's Harbour Master of the Dockyard at HMS St Angelo, Malta.1
Beresford, Lord Hugh Tristram de la Poer A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Lieutenant Commander of the Destroyer HMS Kelly. He was accidentally killed on 23 May 1942 when the Destroyer HMS Kipling had to avoid an attack while rescuing men.1
Best, Julian William A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 in roles based from various shore establishments including HMS Forte in Falmouth and HMS Nile in Alexandria including convoy duties and being the Naval Officer-in-Charge of Mersa Matruh.1
Bickford, Edward Oscar A Royal Navy officer who commanded during WW2 the submarine HMS Salmon which became the first boat to sink a U-boat on 4 dec 1939 when it torpedoed the German U-36 in the North Sea south-west of Kristiansand. he was killed when HMS Salmon is thought to have run into a minefield off the coast of Norway in Jul 1940.1
Birnie, Harry Charles A Scottish sea captain and naval officer. He served in the Royal Navy in both World Wars and his peace-time career was spent with the Cunard Line. He was killed in action while in command of merchant convoy SC 121 in the North Atlantic in 1943.1
Bisset, Arthur William La Touche A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commanding Officer of the aircraft carrier HMS Formidable in 1942 and later had Rear Admiral commands within Naval Air Stations, Force H and Escort Carriers.1
Bone, Howard Francis A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarine HMS Sealion prior to WW2, the submarines HMS Tigris and Otway during WW2 and later was Captain-in-Charge of Naval Base Simon's Town in South Africa.1
Boyd, Denis William A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commanding Officer of the aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious in 1940, Admiral commanding aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean Fleet in 1941, Admiral commanding aircraft carriers in the Eastern Fleet in 1942 and later Chief of Naval Air Equipment.1
Bremner, Richard Elliott Gordon A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as on the Destroyer HMS Greyhound and was killed on 22nd May 1941 after the ship was sunk.1
Bromage, John Henry A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Tribune, H33 and Sahib during WW2 and became a prisoner of war in Italy from 24 Apr 1943 when Sahib was scuttled.1
Broome, John Egerton A Royal Navy officer who served in both World Wars. He commanded the 1st escort group in the Destroyer HMS Keppel which escorted the unfortunate Arctic Convoy PQ-17 which was given an incorrect order to scatter leading to great loss and controversy.1
Brown, John Frederick Beaufoy A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Unity, Taku and Otus during WW2. He later commanded HMS Boxer, was Capt of the Far East Fleet and Aide de Camp to HM Queen Elizabeth II.1
Browne, Hugh Christopher A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarine HMS regent and the submarine base at Lerwick, HMS Ambrose II during WW2. He later commanded HMS Maidstone and the RN Air Station at Gosport, HMS Siskin.1
Brownrigg, Sir Henry John Studholme A Royal Navy officer with a long career who had been Commander-in-Chief, The Nore before his retirement. He came out of retirement to take charge of convoys and as Commodore of Convoy ON 16 ran into a storm and lost his life when the ship 'Ville de Tamatave' was lost with all hands.1
Bryant, Benjamin A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Sealion, Safari and the submarine depot ships HMS Montclare, Cyclops and Firth during WW2. He was the most successful British submarine ace to survive the war in terms of ships sunk and later was Commanding Officer, HMS Glasgow Apr 1953 to May 1954 and Deputy Chief of Naval Personnel, (Training) from Jul 1954 to Feb 1957.1
Burnett, Philip Whitworth A Royal Navy Officer who was active in the Battle of the Atlantic during WW2 as an Escort Group commander and later Rear-Admiral as Chief of Staff to the Commander-in-Chief Portsmouth.1
Bush, John Edward Scott A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the First Lieutenant of the Destroyer HMS Kipling. He was accidentally killed on 23 May 1942 when the ship had to avoid an attack while rescuing men.1
Cameron, Donald A Royal Navy officer who commanded the midget submarine HMS X6 during WW2. He was a Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross for an attack on the Tirpitz on 22 Sep 1943. He was later in charge of HMS Dolphin, the submarine base at Fort Blockhouse.1
Campbell, John Duncan Vaughan, Earl Cawdor A Scots-Welsh nobleman who fought in WW1, with the Royal Navy and was decorated with the award of the Territorial Decoration and also fought in WW2 as a Lieutenant-Colonel commanding the 4th Camerons.1
Campbell, John Oliver A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commander of the Gunboat HMS Aphis and roles within various shore establishments including HMS Nile in Alexandria, Senior Naval Officer, Cyrenaica & Naval Officer-in-Charge, Benghazi, HMS St Angelo in Malta, HMS Hannibal in Taranto and HMS Pembroke in Chatham.1
Cayley, Richard Douglas A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Parthian, Utmost and P311 during WW2 and was one of the most decorated submarine commanders. He lost his life when HMS P311 went missing in Jan 1943. It was later discovered off the coast of Sardinia.1
Colvin, George Robson A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H43, Sunfish, Graph, Sealion and Tigris during WW2. He was killed in Mar 1943 when HMS Tigris was depth charged and destroyed by the German submarine chaser UJ-2210 off the coast of Naples.1
Cooke, Geoffrey Clement A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially as the Deputy Director of the Naval Intelligence Division and later as the Commander of the Battleship HMS Barham. He was killed when HMS Barham was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine on 25 Nov 1941.1
Creasy, George Elvey A Royal Navy officer who during WW2 commanded the destroyers HMS Grenville and Codrington, and the battleship HMS Duke of York and was Rear-Admiral (Submarines). After WW2 he was flag officer for the Far East Fleet, Fifth Sea Lord, Vice Chief of the Naval Staff, commander-in-chief of Home Fleet and finally the Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth.1
Creswell, George Hector A Royal Navy officer who commanded the 4th Destroyer Flotilla (Mediterranean) up to the start of WW2 and then served as a staff officer in many theatres including as the officer in charge of the Alexandria Base.1
Crouch, Cecil Bernard A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Swordfish, L27, Oberon and Thunderbolt during WW2. He died during the loss of HMS Thunderbolt in March 1943.1
Cunningham, Andrew Browne, 1st Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope A British admiral of WW2 who was Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet and led forces in the attack on Taranto and the Battle of Cape Matapan. He controlled the defence of the Mediterranean supply lines and also directed support for the major Allied landings in the Western Mediterranean. In 1943, Cunningham was promoted to First Sea Lord.2
D’Arcy, Kenneth Judge A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commanding Officer of the Sloop HMS Grimsby and the Escort Carrier HMS Queen. He also served on the Mobile Naval Base Defence Organisation’s Depot Ship HMS Martial.1
Davies, George Philip Sevier A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarine HMS Tribune during its commissioning stage in WW2 and also received an OBE for his work planning Operation Source, the attack on the Tirpitz.1
Dewhurst, Ronald Hugh A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Rorqual and Amphion during WW2. He later commanded HMS Taciturn and the Royal Navy Detention Quarters at Portsmouth.1
Duff, Arthur Anthony A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Otway, L23 and Stubborn during WW2. He was later a senior British diplomat, a Privy Counciller in 1980 and the Director General of MI5 from 1985 to 1988.1
Dunbar-Nasmith, Sir Martin Eric A Royal Navy Officer who was awarded the Victoria Cross in WW1 while serving as Commander of H.M. Submarine E.11 in 1915 in the Turkish theatre and was later Commander-in-Chief of Plymouth and Western Approaches Command from the outbreak of WW2 in September 1939.1
Eaden, John Henry A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Spearfish, Venetia, Utmost and Upright during WW2. He also commanded the destroyers HMS Walpole and Inconstant, the frigate HMS Chelmer and the cruiser HMS Caradoc.1
Eaton, Sir John William Musgrave A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 commanding the destroyers HMS Venetia, HMS Mohawk, HMS Somali and HMS Eskimo. He ended his career the Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station and Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic in 1955.1
Edelsten, Sir John Hereward A Royal Navy officer who served during WW2 as Chief of Staff to the Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Station in 1941 and Rear Admiral (Destroyers) for the British Pacific Fleet in 1945. He was the Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet in 1950.1
Egerton, Wion de Malpas A Royal Navy officer who retired in 1930 with the rank of Vice-Admiral and was called back to service in WW2 as a Convoy Commodore. He died when HMS Fidelity was torpedoed having already been rescued from his own torpedoed ship, the Empire Shackleton.1
Fegen, Edward Stephen Fogarty A Royal Navy Officer who was awarded the Victoria Cross in WW2 while serving as acting Captain commanding the armed merchantman HMS Jervis Bay. He saved 31 ships of the convoy HX-84 by engaging the German pocket battleship Admiral Scheer for 22 minutes before going down with his ship.1
Fitzmaurice, Raymond A Royal Navy officer who retired in 1929 as the Captain of the Battleship HMS Iron Duke. He was called back to service in WW2 with the rank of Commodore, Second Class but succumbed to angina in 1943.1
Forbes, John Hay A Royal Navy officer who commanded during WW2 the submarine HMS Spearfish which torpedoed the German heavy cruiser Lützow on 11 Apr 1940, putting her out of action for over a year. He was killed on 1 Aug 1940 when HMS Spearfish was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-34.1
Ford, Wilbraham Tennyson Randle A Royal Navy officer who was the Vice-Admiral-in-Charge, Malta between Jan 1937 and Dec 1941 and Admiral Superintendent Malta Dockyard at HMS St Angelo. He was transferred to be Commander-in-Chief, Rosyth after June 1942.1
Garrett, R A British Royal Marine soldier made famous for an action during the rearguard evacuation of Crete. There he assembled nearly 150 mixed soldiers and led them for over a week on a voyage in a small boat for 230 miles to the Libyan coast followed by a march across desert to the nearest base.2
Glennie, Irvine Gordon A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Flag Captain commanding HMS Hood and Chief of Staff of the Battle Cruiser Squadron from 1939. He also served as Commander of Destroyers in the Mediterranean Fleet from 1941 and the Commander of Destroyers in the Home Fleet from 1943 and Senior Naval Officer, Western Atlantic from 1944.1
Gould, Thomas William A Royal Navy officer who received the Victoria Cross for bravery in February 1942 for recovery of an unexploded bomb lodged between the pressure and outer hull of HMS submarine Thrasher.1
Grantham, Guy A Royal Navy officer who commanded many vessels in WW2 including the Cruiser HMS Phoebe during the evacuation from Greece, the Cruiser HMS Naiad which was sunk by Torpedo, the Cruiser HMS Cleopatra during the second Battle of Birte, and the Aircraft Carrier HMS Indomitable in the landings in Sicily.1
Greenland, Richard Thomas Goodwin A Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve officer who was honoured for his role in sinking the Italian cruiser Ulpio Traiano in Palermo as part of an attack by midget submarines and was later in WW2 held as a prisoner of war.1
Gregory, George David Archibald A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Sturgeon, Oberon and Traveller during WW2 and later was appointed Commodore-in-Charge, Hong Kong from Mar 1957 to April 1960, Admiral-Superintendent, Devonport in 1960, and Flag Officer Scotland and Northern Ireland in 1964.1
Gretton, Sir Peter William A Royal Navy Officer who was active in the Battle of the Atlantic during WW2 as commander of HMS Duncan and the Senior Officer Escort to Escort Group B7. He eventually rose to become Fifth Sea Lord and retired as a vice admiral.1
Haggard, Hugh Alfred Vernon A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H44 and Truant during 1939-1943.1
Hampton, Thomas Claud A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commanding Officer of the Anti-Aircraft Cruiser HMS Carlisle. He was killed on 22nd May 1941 when the Carlisle was hit on the bridge by a bomb and badly damaged.1
Hart, Raymond A Royal Navy officer who during WW2 was part of the B-7 Escort group participating in destroying many U-boats and later was commander of 21 Escort Group.1
Harvey, John Robert Garstin A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H50, Osiris, Otway, Tuna, Trusty and Safari during WW2.1
Harwood, Sir Henry A British naval officer who won fame in the Battle of the River Plate in 1940. In September 1936 he was appointed Commodore and given command of the South American Division of the America and West Indies Station.2
Henty-Creer, H A Royal Navy officer who commanded the midget submarine HMS X5 during WW2. He was lost during a mission to attack the Tirpitz in Sep 1943 while on the way to Palermo.1
Hezlet, Arthur Richard A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H44, Upholder, Unique, Ursula, Trident, Thrasher and Trenchant during WW2. He later commanded the destroyer HMS Scorpion, the 6th Destroyer Squadron, was Flag Officer Submarines at Gosport and Flag Officer Scotland and Northern Ireland. He was the youngest admiral and became a military historian.1
Hickling, Harold A Royal Navy officer who served initially in WW2 at the shore stations of HMS President and HMS Nile. He was the first commander of the Mediterranean Inshore Squadron from Jan 1941 and later the Commanding Officer of the Cruiser HMS Glasgow.1
Horton, Sir Max Kennedy A British submariner during WW1 and commander-in-chief of the Western Approaches in the latter half of WW2, responsible for British participation in the Battle of the Atlantic. He devised the system of support groups, who would travel with convoys, but have more freedom in pursuing submarines than the escort group.2
Huddart, John Symons A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H44, L27, H34, H43, Proteus and Triumph during WW2. He lost his life in Jan 1942 when the Triumph is believed to have strayed into a minefield in the Aegean Sea.1
Hunt, George Edward A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H33, H50, Ultor and Taku during WW2. Later he was the commander of the anti-submarine training establishment HMS Osprey, the frigate HMS Bigbury Bay, Chief Staff Officer to Flag Officer Submarines and Director of Naval Equipment, Ship Department, Admiralty.1
Hutchinson, Christopher Haynes A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Sealion and Truant during 1940.1
Hutchison, Colin Alexander Gordon A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially as a staff officer at the shore establishment of HMS President and later as the Commanding Officer of the Auxiliary Supply Ship HMS Breconshire, Infantry Landing Ship HMS Glenearn and Heavy Repair Ship HMS Ausonia.1
Ingram, David Caldicott A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Phoenix, Clyde and Cyclops during WW2. He was later the Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence, Naval Intelligence Division, Admiralty.1
Jervis, John, 1st Earl of St Vincent A Royal Navy Officer and Member of Parliament who served throughout the latter half of the 18th century and early 19th, an active commander during the Seven Years’ War, American War of Independence, French Revolutionary War and the Napoleonic Wars. He introduced a series of severe standing orders to avert mutiny that made him a controversial figure.1
Jewell, Norman Limbury Auchinleck A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS L27, Seraph, Sea Nymph, Tactician, Trespasser and Sportsman during WW2. On 30 Apr 1943 in a disinformation exercise 'Operation Mincemeat', HMS Seraph buried a man dressed as a Royal Marines officer with 'secret' plans off of the Spanish coast. He provided the reports used in the book 'Secret Mission Submarine' by Cecil Carnes decribing the Seraph's service.1
Kelly, William Henry A Royal Navy officer who retired in 1928 and was called back to service in WW2 as a Convoy Commodore. He died when the Convoy OB-323’s Commodore ship the 'Adda' was torpedoed west-southwest of Freetown in 1941.1
Keyes, Roger John Brownlow, 1st Baron Keyes A British Admiral who was the liaison officer to the Belgian Army in May 1940. He became the first Director of Combined Operations in June 1940 and implemented plans for the training of commandos.1
King, Edward Leigh Stuart A Royal Navy officer who commanded the home fleet at the start of WW2 and later from July 1940 the 15th Cruiser Squadron (Mediterranean).1
King, Henry Alexander A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commanding Officer of the destroyer HMS Kashmir and Cruiser HMS Nigeria and also had shore roles with the Gunnery School at Portsmouth and Admiralty’s Gunnery Division.1
Lambert, Douglas A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H33, Sealion, Surf and Thermopylae during WW2.1
Leatham, Ralph A Royal Navy officer who was appointed Commander of the 1st Battle Squadron in 1938 and initially in WW2 was the Commander-in-Chief, East Indies Station. He became the Flag Officer in Command, Malta and then Deputy Governor of Malta in 1943 and later becoming Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth.1
Lee-Barber, John A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commander of the Destroyer HMS Griffin in the Norwegian campaign and in the Mediterranean. He commanded the Destroyer HMS Opportune and was later the Commander-in-Charge of HMS King Alfred, the training establishment at Hove.1
Lees, Dennis Marescaux A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commanding Officer of the Cruiser HMS Calcutta, sunk on Jun 1st 1941 and later the Cruiser HMS Black Prince until 1945.1
Linton, John Wallace A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Pandora and Turbulent during WW2 and was killed in action in La Maddalena Harbour, Italy, on 23 March 1943. He was a Welsh recipient of the Victoria Cross.1
Macdonald, Malcolm Henry Somerled A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Naval Officer in charge of the Port of Heraklion during the Battle for Crete and its eventual evacuation during May and June 1941.1
Mack, Philip John A Royal Navy officer who served during early WW2 as Commander of the Destroyers HMS Jervis and HMS Jervis, the 7th and 14th Destroyer Flotillas and later the Battleship HMS King George V. Died in an Air Crash in 1943.1
Mackenzie, Hugh Stirling A Royal Navy officer who became Flag Officer Submarines and Chief Polaris Executive. He served in submarines during WW2 commanding the submarines HMS H28, H43, Thrasher and Tantalus during 1941-45.1
Marshall-A’Deane, Walter Roger A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commanding Officer of the Destroyer HMS Greyhound. He was killed while attempting to rescue survivors from HMS Fiji after his own ship had been lost on 22 May 1941, for which he received the Albert Medal.1
Martin, Desmond Samuel Royce A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H28, Una, Ultimatum, Seadog, Tuna and Terrapin during WW2. An account of his service on HMS Tuna is contained in the book 'The seas between - Letters from a Submariner' by Guy Mannering.1
Maydon, Stephen Lynch Conway A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS L26, Umbra and Tradewind during WW2. Later he became the member of parliament for 'Wells' in 1951 which he held until 1970.1
McCoy, John Wentworth A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Triumph and Oberon and the destroyer HMS Wolfhound during WW2. Prior to WW2 he had commanded other submarines including HMS Phoenix, H34 and R4.1
McGeoch, Ian Lachlan Mackay A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H43 and Splendid during WW2 and became a prisoner of war in Italy from 21 Apr 1943 when Splendid was scuttled, later escaping. In 1964 he became Admiral President of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, from May 1965 to Dec 1967 was Flag Officer Submarines and from 1967 Flag Officer Scotland and Northern Ireland.1
Meeke, William Gordon A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Una and Shalimar during WW2. He was later the Executive Officer at the Royal Navy Air Station HMS Falcon and an aide-de-camp to Queen Elizabeth II.1
Miers, Anthony Cecil Capel A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarine HMS Torbay during WW2 and was later Commander (Submarines) of the 8th Submarine Flotilla. He was a Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross.1
Mills, Ronald George A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarine HMS Tetrarch in the first year of WW2 and later the Frigate HMS Duckworth1
Morse, John Anthony Vere A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commanding Officer of HMS Neptune (cruiser), Flag Captain and Chief of Staff of Africa Station, Naval Officer-in-Charge at Suda and also the Flag Officer of Western Italy, Northern Mediterranean Area and later Malaya.1
Mountbatten, Louis, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma A British naval officer, statesman and second cousin once removed of Elizabeth II. During WW2, he commanded the 5th Destroyer Flotilla, the aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious and later was Supreme Allied Commander, South East Asia Command (1943–46).1
Nicholl, Angus Dacres A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially as a Naval Assistant Secretary at the shore establishment of HMS President and later as the Commanding Officer of the Light Cruiser HMS Penelope and the Battleship HMS Duke of York.1
Noble, Sir Percy Lockhart Harnam A Royal Navy officer who served in both World Wars. He was Commander-in-Chief, Western Approaches for two years during the early WW2 period when his work in reorganising escort groups and escort training methods are regarded as having been crucial to the later success in the Atlantic theatre.1
Norman, Edward Dudley A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H40, Otway, Upright, Graph and Tuna during WW2. He later became the commanding officer of the Royal Malayan Navy after their independence in 1957.1
O’Conor, Rory Chambers A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially as a staff officer at the shore establishment of HMS President and later as the Commanding Officer of the Cruiser HMS Neptune. He was killed on 19th Dec 1941 when HMS Neptune sank after the flotilla Force K ran into a newly laid Italian minefield.1
Petrie, Christopher Henry A Royal Navy officer who begun WW2 as the Commanding Officer of Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS Bulolo and then commanded the Troop Ship HMS Glengyle until the end of 1941. He moved onto shore roles at HMS Saker (Washington), HMS Salsette (Bombay), HMS Eland (Freetown) and later a Naval Officer-in-Charge of the 'Mulberry B'; floating harbour.1
Phillips, George Chesterman A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarine HMS Ursula, submarine base HMS Elfin and the submarine depot ship HMS Talbot during WW2.1
Pitt, Arthur John Wright A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H33, P612, Taku, Trident and Auriga during WW2.1
Place, Basil Charles Godfrey A Royal Navy officer who commanded the midget submarine HMS X7 during WW2. He was a recipient of the Victoria Cross for an attack on the Tirpitz on 22 Sep 1943. He later commanded the destroyer HMS Tumult, the frigate HMS Rothesay, the training establishment HMS Ganges and the light fleet carrier HMS Albion.1
Pleydell-Bouverie, Edward A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 in various roles including the Naval Attaché Paris, on the staff of the Flag Officer Commanding Force H, Commander of the Minelayer HMS Abdiel and later the Commanding Officer of the Coastal Forces base HMS Hornet.1
Poland, Albert Lawrence A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commanding Officer of many vessels including the Cruiser HMS Liverpool, Destroyer HMS Jervis, Destroyer HMS Relentless and was also a Senior Naval Officer of the Inshore Squadron during 1941.1
Pound, Sir Alfred Dudley Pickman Rogers A senior Royal Navy officer who served in WW1 as a battleship commander, taking part in the Battle of Jutland. He was the First Sea Lord for the first four years of WW2 during the Battle of the Atlantic, but his judgment has been challenged including his order in 1942 to disperse Convoy PQ17.1
Power, Arthur John A Royal Navy officer who before WW2 commanded the Aircraft Carrier HMS Ark Royal. During WW2 he played a leading role in the planning for the Allied invasion of Sicily and Italy and commanded the naval forces for the landings at Taranto in Italy in September 1943. He went on to be Commander-in-Chief of the East Indies Fleet.1
Pridham-Wippell, Sir Henry Daniel A Royal Navy officer who served during early WW2 as Commander of the 1st Battle Squadron in the Mediterranean from July 1940 and survived the sinking of the battleship HMS Barham in Nov 1941. After the War he was the Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth.1
Raikes, Richard Prendergast A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS L26, Tribune, Seawolf and Tuna during WW2. On 7 dec 1942 HMS Tuna delivered Special Boat Service commandos to the mouth of the Gironde for a raid on Bordeaux, an operation dramatised in the film 'The Cockleshell Heroes'.1
Ravenhill, Richard William A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially as the Commander of the Destroyer HMS Nubian and later as the Deputy Chief of Staff to the Commander-in-Chief Western Approaches before being given the command of the Cruiser HMS Newfoundland.1
Rawlings, Henry Bernard A Royal Navy officer with a long WW2 record including command of the 1st Battle Squadron and 7th Cruiser Squadron, Flag Officer Eastern Mediterranean and later Second-in-Command of the British Pacific Fleet.1
Rimington, Michael Gordon A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Parthian and Tantivity during WW2. He later commanded the cruiser HMS Jamaica and the light fleet carrier HMS Glory.1
Roberts, Peter Scawen Watkinson A Royal Navy officer who received the Victoria Cross for bravery in February 1942 for recovery of an unexploded bomb lodged between the pressure and outer hull of HMS submarine Thrasher.1
Robson, William Geoffrey Arthur A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commander of the destroyer HMS Kandahar and then with combined operations from 1943 before commanding the 26th Destroyer Flotilla in 1944 and then Captain of Coastal Forces for The Nore in 1945.1
Rowley, Henry Aubrey A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commanding Officer of the Cruisers HMS Calypso and HMS Gloucester. He was killed when HMS Gloucester was sunk in the Eastern Mediterranean by German bombers during the German invasion of Crete on 22 May 1941.1
Simpson, George Walter Gillow A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Porpoise and Sealion, the submarine depot ship Talbot and the 10th Submarine Flotilla during WW2. He was later the Commanding Officer of the cruiser HMS Birmingham, Chief of Naval Staff Royal New Zealand Navy, Chief British Naval Representative on Allied Control Commission and the Flag Officer Submarines.1
Sladen, Geoffrey Mainwaring A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Osward and Trident during 1939-42 and later the cruiser HMS Sheffield and destroyer HMS Musketeer.1
Smith, Frank Montem A Royal Naval Reserve officer who served in WW2 initially as the Commanding Officer of the Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS Arpha and later as the Naval Officer-in-Charge of Tobruk. He was killed on 21st Jun 1942 during the evacuation procedure when the city was re-taken by the Axis forces.1
Somerville, Philip A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commanding Officer of the Destroyer HMS Kingston. (Previously HMS Echo and HMS Wren) He was killed on 4 April 1942 when a bomb fell directly onto the dock at Malta where part of the ships crew was taking shelter.1
Somerville, Sir James Fownes, GCB, GBE, DSO, DL A Royal Navy Officer who was an Admiral of the fleet. He destroyed the French fleet at El Kébir in Algeria.1
St. Clair-Ford, Aubrey A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commanding Officer of the destroyers HMS Encounter (Home Fleet) and HMS Kipling and later having shore roles with Combined Operations HQ, HMS President and HMS Saker.1
St. John, Michael Beauchamp A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS L26, Oberon, Tuna, Traveller, Parthian, Otway and Totem during WW2.1
Stephenson, Sir Gilbert Owen A Royal Navy Officer who was a pioneer of anti-submarine techniques in WW1, and was most famous as an important Naval training commandant during WW2. He set up and ran the training base HMS Western Isles at Tobermory on the Isle of Mull as the Royal Navy’s Anti-Submarine Training School.1
Stevens, John Samuel A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS Triumpth, H44, H32, Unruffled and Turpin during WW2.1
Stokes, Graham Henry A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commander of many vessels including the Destroyers HMS Mackay, HMS Matabele and HMS Sik; and also the Aircraft Carrier HMS Colossus.1
Syfret, Edward Neville A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially as Captain of the Battleship HMS Rodney. He was the commander of the 18th Cruiser Squadron of the Home Fleet in 1941, appointed Commander of Force H in 1942 and later became Vice Chief of the Naval Staff.1
Tennant, Sir William George 'Bill' A British Captain who was lauded for his efforts in organising the evacuation from Dunkirk. In June 1944, he was the admiral in charge of the transport, assembly and setup of the two Mulberry harbours that provided port facilities for the coming invasion of Normandy.1
Thomas, Mervyn Somerset A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commanding Officer of the Destroyers HMS Grafton, HMS Dainty and HMS Faulknor; and also the Sloop HMS Auckland. He was also the Commander of HMS Heron, the Royal Navy Air Station at Yeovilton.1
Tilston, Arthur Robert James A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 Commanding a series of smaller vessels including the Whalers HMS Kos XXI, HMS Jade, HMS Northern Isles, HMS Arctic Explorer and the Corvettes HMS Geranium and HMS Violet.1
Tomkinson, Edward Philip A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H33 and Urge during WW2. He lost his life when HMS Urge disappeared in May 1942, presumed lost in the Mediterranean on its way from Malta to Alexandrea.1
Turner, Ernest John Donaldson A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS L23, Sibyl and Affray during WW2 and later commanded the 4th Submarine Squadron in Sydney and the 1st Submarine Flotilla in Portsmouth. He became Captain-in-Charge Clyde (HMS Cochrane) involved in the arrival of the Polaris nuclear system at Faslane.1
Tyrwhitt, St. John Reginald Joseph A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Commanding Officer of the Destroyers HMS Defender, HMS Juno and HMS Tartar.1
Vian, Philip Louis A Royal Navy officer who in early WW2 commanded the forces that released captured sailors from the German supply ship Altmark and was part of the final action against the German battleship Bismarck. Most of Vian’s service was in the Mediterranean, where he commanded the 15th Cruiser Squadron from Oct 1941 and Force V from Sep 1943.1
Walker, Frederic John A Royal Navy officer who was commander of the 36th Escort Group from October 1941 and in 1943 became commander of the 2nd Support Group from his ship HMS Starling and was responsible for hunting and destroying many U-Boats up to D-Day. In 1944, his funeral took place at the Liverpool Anglican Cathedral with full naval honours and attended by about 1,000 people.1
Walter, Philip Norman A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 initially as the Commanding Officer of the Destroyer HMS Fame and later as the senior officer of the Inshore Squadron at Tobruk where he was injured and taken prisoner when the city was re-taken by the Axis forces in Jun 1942.1
Wanklyn, Malcolm David A Royal Navy WW2 submarine ace and one of the most successful western navy submariners with the sinking of 16 enemy vessels. He received the Victoria Cross for the sinking of the heavily defended transport SS Conte Rosso without a working Asdic. His submarine HMS Upholder was missing in action in April 1942.2
Watkins, Guy Claud Ian St Barbe Slade A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H33, Otway and Triton during WW2. He died during the loss of HMS Triton in December 1940.1
Watson, Bertram Chalmers A Royal Navy officer who prior to WW2 commanded the cruiser HMS Curlew and the battleship HMS Valiant and was Rear Admiral, Submarines in 1938. He was later the Flag Officer Greenock and Flag Officer Commanding, Iceland during WW2.1
Wauchope, Colin A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commander of the Inshore Squadron based at Alexandria which was used for supply missions into the North African ports during the reconquest of Libya and Tunisia.1
Weston, Eric Culpeper A British General who commmanded the Royal Marine 1st Mobile Naval Base Defence Organisation (MNBDO1) tasked with setting up a base in Crete during the Battle for Crete. He took over command of the Suda area of Crete after General Freyberg.2
William-Powlett, Peveril Barton Reibey Wallop A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as Director of Manning at the Admiralty and then commanded the cruiser HMS Fiji which was sunk during the Battle of Crete in 1941. He was Chief of Staff of Force H at Gibraltar in 1941, commanded HMS Newcastle from 1942 and was then Captain of the Home Fleet in 1944.1
Wingfield, Mervyn Robert George A Royal Navy officer who served in submarines throughout WW2, being the first British submarine commander to sink a Japanese submarine and commanded the submarines HMS H28, Umpire, Sturgeon and Taurus.1
Woods, Wilfrid John Wentworth A Royal Navy officer who became the Commander-in-Chief Home Fleet and Commander-in-Chief Eastern Atlantic in the early 60's. During WW2 he commanded the submarines HMS Triumph and Forth.1
Wraith, John Somerton A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS H43, Upright and Trooper during WW2. He lost his life in Oct 1943 when HMS Trooper was presumed lost near the Greek island of Leros in German minefields.1
Wynne, Trethowan Campbell Trevredyn A Royal Navy officer who served in WW2 as the Commander of the Light Cruiser HMS Orion in the Mediterranean Theatre. Later he held Intelligence Staff Officer roles as Captain-in-Charge, Jamaica [HMS Morgan] and within the British Admiralty, Washington [HMS Saker].1
Young, Edward Preston A Royal Navy officer who commanded the submarines HMS P555 and Storm during WW2, being the first Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve officer to command a submarine. He was foremost a graphic designer and publisher responsible for designing the cover scheme used by Penguin and drawing the original penguin logo. His wartime service is described in his book 'One Of Our Submarines'.1
Political
Anderson, John A British civil servant and politician who is best known for his service in the Cabinet during the Second World War, for which he was nicknamed The Home Front Prime Minister.1
Attlee, Clement A British politician who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951 and the Leader of the Labour Party from 1935 to 1955. He lead the Labour Party to a landslide election victory in 1945.1
Beveridge, William Henry, 1st Baron A British economist and social reformer. Best known for his report on Social Insurance in 1942 (The Beverage Report).1
Bevin, Ernest A British statesman, trade union leader, and Labour politician who co-founded and served as general secretary of the Transport and General Workers’ Union from 1922 to 1940. He served as Minister of Labour in the war-time coalition government.1
Brown, Ernest A British politician who served as leader of the Liberal Nationals from 1940 until 1945. He was the Minister of Health from 8th Feb 1941 to 11th Nov 19431
Chamberlain, Arthur Neville A British Conservative politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from May 1937 to May 1940. Chamberlain is best known for his appeasement foreign policy, and in particular for his signing of the Munich Agreement in 1938.4
Churchill, Winston A British politician who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century.19
Cripps, Sir Richard Stafford A British Labour politician who served a number of positions during the wartime coalition including as Minister of Aircraft Production from Nov 1942 to May 1945.1
Dalton, Edward Hugh John Neale. A British Labour Party economist and politician who was Chancellor from 1945-7 and President of the Board of Trade from 1942-5.1
Eden, Robert Anthony, 1st Earl of Avon An English politician who served three periods as Foreign Secretary including for most of WW2 and a short period as Prime Minister which ended with his resignation on 9 Jan 1957 due to Britain’s role in the Suez crisis.2
Greene, Wilfred Arthur, 1st Baron Greene A British lawyer and judge, noted for creating two crucial principles of administrative law, the Wednesbury and Carltona doctrines. He was a Lord Justice of Appeal from 1935 to 1937 and Master of the Rolls between 1937 and 1949.1
Hankey, Maurice Pascal Alers, 1st Baron Hankey A British civil servant who was the top aide to Prime Minister David Lloyd George during in WW1. He later became Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster in May 1940 and Paymaster-General In July 1941.1
Henderson, Sir Nevile Meyrick A British diplomat who was Ambassador of the United Kingdom to Nazi Germany from 1937 to 1939.2
Hore-Belisha, Leslie, 1st Baron Hore-Belisha A British Liberal, then National Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) and Cabinet Minister.1
Jackson, Edward St. John A British colonial judge and administrator who was the Legal Secretary to the Government of Malta between 1937 and 1940. Between 1940 and 1943 he was Malta's Lieutenant Governor during the Siege of Malta and from 1943 the Chief Justice of Cyprus.1
Kennard, Sir Howard William A British diplomat who was Chargé d’Affaires, and British Ambassador to Poland at the outbreak of the Second World War.1
Kingsley Wood, Sir Howard An English politician who became a member of the London County Council and then a Member of Parliament as a Conservative. As Secretary of State for Air in the months before the Second World War he oversaw a huge increase in the production of warplanes to bring Britain up to parity with Germany.1
Llewellin, John Jestyn A British army officer, Conservative Party politician and minister in Winston Churchill’s war government. He became Minister of Aircraft Production in which capacity he served on the Combined Policy Committee.0
Marquis, Frederick James, 1st Earl of Woolton An English businessman, statesman and politician and wartime Minister of Food from Apr 1940 until 1943.3
Norton, Clifford The British Chargé d’Affaires at Warsaw at the beginning of the second world war.1
Self, Albert Henry A British civil servant who was responsible for arranging purchase of American aircraft to fulfil the needs of the Royal Air Force during WW2 as part of the 'British Air Commission'. He later became Permanent Secretary to the Ministry of Civil Aviation.1
Shepherd, Gerald The British Consul General in Danzig from 1937 to 1939.1
Simon, John Allsebrook, 1st Viscount Simon A British politician who held senior Cabinet posts from the beginning of WW1 to the end of WW2. He is one of only three people to have served as Home Secretary, Foreign Secretary and Chancellor of the Exchequer.1
Sinclair, Archibald Henry Macdonald, 1st Viscount Thurso A British politician and leader of the Liberal Party. He became the Secretary of State for Air in the coalition government in 1940 and was tasked to work with the RAF in planning the Battle of Britain.1
Wood, Edward Frederick Lindley A British politician and diplomat who was Foreign Secretary from 1938 to 1940. He was known as Viscount Halifax from 1934 to 1944.1
Royal
George VI, King of the United Kingdom King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.2
King James I of England A king of Scotland from 24 Jul 1567 (as James VI) and of England/Ireland from 24 Mar 1603.2
Scientific
Bragg, Sir William Lawrence An Australian-born British physicist and X-ray crystallographer, discoverer of Bragg’s law of X-ray diffraction, which is basic for the determination of crystal structure. He was joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1915.1
Clegg, H.A. , M.A.,M.B., M.R.C.P. A Doctor who was the Deputy Editor of the British Medical Journal in the 1930’s.1
Hele-Shaw, Henry Selby An English mechanical and automobile engineer who was the inventor of the variable-pitch propellor and a fellow of the Royal Society.1
Hill, Dr. Charles A British cabinet minister, doctor and television executive who broadcast as the 'Radio Doctor' as part of the Ministry of Food’s programme, 'Kitchen Front', every morning from 1942.2
Morris, William Richard, 1st Viscount Nuffield A British motor manufacturer who was the founder of Morris Motors Ltd and also the founder of the Nuffield Foundation.1
Sayer, Flight Lieutenant Philip Edward Gerald A chief test pilot for Gloster Aircraft and an R.A.F. officer who flew Britains maiden jet flight in the Gloster E.28/39.1
Tizard, Sir Henry Thomas A chemist, inventor and Chair of the Aeronautical Research Committee who led the deployment of Radar. He led the Tizard mission to the U.S.A. introducing them to the British secret advances in the cavity magnetron and jet engines.1
Watson-Watt, Sir Robert Alexander A pioneer and significant contributor to the development of radar. He was the superintendent of the Bawdsey Research Station established under the Air Ministry.1
Whittle, Air Commodore Sir Frank An English R.A.F. engineer who is credited with inventing the turbo-jet engine.1
Sporting
Augustine Courtauld A yachtsman and British Arctic explorer, best known for serving as the solo meteorologist of the 'Icecap Station', located in the interior of Greenland in 1930–1931. During WW2 he was an officer in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, seconded to No. 14 (Arctic) Commando.1
Grace, William Gilbert An early English amateur cricketer widely concidered to be one of its greatest ever players and generally known as 'W.G.'1
Watkins, Henry George 'Gino' A British Arctic explorer who led the British Arctic Air Route Expedition of 1930–31 to survey the east coast of Greenland and made an open boat journey of 600 nautical miles around the King Frederick VI Coast bringing him international fame.1